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Hot Toys Iron Spider review

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1 Hot Toys Iron Spider review on Sun Dec 23, 2018 8:01 pm

I'm late with my review tonight - I was out Xmas shopping. Somehow I survived. The humanity! I'm checking out the latest Hot Toys release from Avengers: Infinity Wars - Iron Spider! This is a unique look for a traditional character:

http://www.mwctoys.com/REVIEW-122418a.htm

You can also find it at the usual:

http://www.mwctoys.com

Thanks for reading!

Michael

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2 Re: Hot Toys Iron Spider review on Sun Dec 23, 2018 8:06 pm

Thanks for the review. This looks like the best Spiderman yet. I'm huge Spiderman fan but haven't purchased any of his action figures for decades. I think I want this one.


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3 Re: Hot Toys Iron Spider review on Sun Dec 23, 2018 8:24 pm

Stryker2011

Stryker2011
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Interesting review. I like the shiny look of the new suit, but I don’t need another Spider-Man.


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4 Re: Hot Toys Iron Spider review on Sun Dec 30, 2018 12:49 pm

Nice review, it confirms that I do not want this figure.

These characters just get sillier and sillier. The original was great, he doesn't need to be loaded down with gadgets.

I've got an idea Marvel, why not create new characters and use your imagination instead of churning out countless versions of the tired old ones?

What's that?

"It's all about the money"

Oh yes, stupid me!

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5 Re: Hot Toys Iron Spider review on Sun Dec 30, 2018 7:19 pm

JohnByng wrote:Nice review, it confirms that I do not want this figure.

These characters just get sillier and sillier. The original was great, he doesn't need to be loaded down with gadgets.

I've got an idea Marvel, why not create new characters and use your imagination instead of churning out countless versions of the tired old ones?

What's that?

"It's all about the money"

Oh yes, stupid me!


Sillier and sillier.” Indeed.

Here is a rather related, somewhat controversial theory that I have, which happens to be supported by my own experiences…


With regard to writing, originality is expensive - because it’s naturally increasingly rare.  However, the industry has lately cultivated a means to circumvent the high costs associated with paying for quality writing; it’s called the internet...  

When original ideas are published on forums such as this, they become accessible to hacks who literally troll these places for a creative impetus which they can then repackage and falsely represent as their own original work.  It’s cost-effective and relatively low-risk.  

The mass majority believe too deeply in the concept of coincidence for any argument claiming theft of intellectual property to be at once appropriately and seriously regarded - and even if it were, it would still be significantly cheaper for the industry to offer settlements to such claims than to pay legitimate screenwriters their proper royalties.  

Having said that, rehashes, remakes, and reboots with already well-known characters is clearly much easier and less expensive than the cost of fresh, new ideas - so I believe that you’re quite right in that it ultimately results in greater profit margins for the studio.  

If there is a moral to all this, it is perhaps that we should take good care to reserve some signature elements of our original works, and to keep such in a secure database (and nothing’s quite as secure as an old-school notebook, truly).  That way, if ever plagiarized in such a manner, you have considerably inarguable proof of your authorship and can stand ground against such thieves.  Of course, that’s assuming that you have the means and status to both afford a quality legal defense, as well as to endure your opponent’s initial efforts which will invariably be to simply discredit you.  

Make sense?


Anyway, a great review of the figure - although I must agree that Spidey’s gimmicks here have gone quite a bit over-the-top for me, too.

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6 Re: Hot Toys Iron Spider review on Mon Dec 31, 2018 7:09 am

Stryker2011

Stryker2011
Founding Father
PureEnergy wrote:If there is a moral to all this, it is perhaps that we should take good care to reserve some signature elements of our original works, and to keep such in a secure database (and nothing’s quite as secure as an old-school notebook, truly).

There’s only two ways this would work: 1. You submit an application (and pay money) to the Copyright office in Washington, DC, Or 2. You put that notebook, etc. in an envelope, go to the Post Office and have it mailed back to yourself (and NEVER open it; the date stamp on your postage acts as a “poor man’s copyright” as long as the package isn’t opened) — it gets opened after you file a law suit. However, the only real way to prevent others from “stealing” your work if it’s that important to you, is NEVER talk about it with anyone, and DON’T post anything on the internet about it. Sadly, if that were the case, we wouldn’t get to see the really cool work of all the customizes on sites like this.

However, coincidences do occur. The human imagination isn’t endless, and the old saying (If you can think of it, someone else has probably thought of it, too) is pretty accurate. If people all over the world didn’t have the ability to think of similar ideas, we wouldn’t need places like the Patent or Copyright Offices to essentially beat someone else to the punch and protect the right that “you got there first”.

Back in the late eighties, while in the service, I was puttering around with the idea of two very different comic books (each led by a female protagonist). Here and there over the years I would jot down my ideas, research things, and even make character sketches. Both of those ideas stopped dead in their tracks when Tomb Raider (the video game) came out in ‘95 (which had too many similar ideas), and the second when Tripping The Rift debuted on TV in 2004 (which had SOME similar ideas). The idea of trying to put out something that was already being done didn’t appeal to me, so both those ideas got shelved. At this point in time, I could probably try to revitalize them, but without massive changes, people would still probably go, “This reminds me of __________”. And neither of these ideas were things I shared with others. Can’t stop coincidence.


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7 Re: Hot Toys Iron Spider review on Mon Dec 31, 2018 10:03 am

Stryker2011 wrote:
PureEnergy wrote:If there is a moral to all this, it is perhaps that we should take good care to reserve some signature elements of our original works, and to keep such in a secure database (and nothing’s quite as secure as an old-school notebook, truly).

There’s only two ways this would work: 1. You submit an application (and pay money) to the Copyright office in Washington, DC, Or 2. You put that notebook, etc. in an envelope, go to the Post Office and have it mailed back to yourself (and NEVER open it; the date stamp on your postage acts as a “poor man’s copyright” as long as the package isn’t opened) — it gets opened after you file a law suit. However, the only real way to prevent others from “stealing” your work if it’s that important to you, is NEVER talk about it with anyone, and DON’T post anything on the internet about it. Sadly, if that were the case, we wouldn’t get to see the really cool work of all the customizes on sites like this.

However, coincidences do occur. The human imagination isn’t endless, and the old saying (If you can think of it, someone else has probably thought of it, too) is pretty accurate. If people all over the world didn’t have the ability to think of similar ideas, we wouldn’t need places like the Patent or Copyright Offices to essentially beat someone else to the punch and protect the right that “you got there first”.

Back in the late eighties, while in the service, I was puttering around with the idea of two very different comic books (each led by a female protagonist). Here and there over the years I would jot down my ideas, research things, and even make character sketches. Both of those ideas stopped dead in their tracks when Tomb Raider (the video game) came out in ‘95 (which had too many similar ideas), and the second when Tripping The Rift debuted on TV in 2004 (which had SOME similar ideas). The idea of trying to put out something that was already being done didn’t appeal to me, so both those ideas got shelved. At this point in time, I could probably try to revitalize them, but without massive changes, people would still probably go, “This reminds me of __________”.  And neither of these ideas were things I shared with others. Can’t stop coincidence.
 

Spiritus Mundi, if you will, or perhaps, the Collective Unconscious - both concepts being feasible to me; nonetheless, coincidence, as a natural phenomenon, is certainly far less common than the theft of intellectual property...  

As I had mentioned, it is from my own experience that I say these things; I cannot be more specific than that, unfortunately - but please do not discount the truth of my observation merely on account of a sense of perceived unlikelihood.  

It’s not a matter of a single specific idea, or even several ideas, but the sequence of such ideas and the statistical improbability of such happening as a matter of mere coincidence being somewhere below the likelihood of being bitten by a whale shark in your living room; that statistical improbability, coupled with the fact that one has posted or “published” significantly similar original material on certain sites which then appears in the same essential formula under another’s credit - having this happen not only once, but on multiple occasions, and always involving a certain, single entity; to call such “coincidental” would be considerably naive.  

I am not suggesting that folk should not share their stories here, but as a method of preservation in lieu of a copyright, if one is in the business or has an interest or intent to perhaps sell such material at a later date, then one should be quite cautious and perhaps reserve some intrinsic, signature connections that might allow for a reasonable claim to the whole of the broader idea.  You’re correct about what constitutes copyright being legal or not, and that those rules are unambiguous; however, such intellectual theft happens all the time, and while the burden of proof is set upon whomever claims that their proverbial pocket has been picked - it is a burden, though not an impossibility - and the concept of “coincidence” does not warrant the weight that it is typically given by those other than mathematicians.  

It is unfortunate that you could have written Tomb Raider, although that’s not quite the same as having written a series of Tomb Raider episodes, published them on an open forum, and then watched them become repackaged and developed by individuals directly connected to that particular forum.

Not incidentally, it is the same abuse of relative anonymity that allows for cyber-bullying and trolling that also makes good cover for such unscrupulous profiteering.

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