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Post Apocalyptic Pinup Patrol Girl: Part II.

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111 - Post Apocalyptic Pinup Patrol Girl: Part II.   Empty Post Apocalyptic Pinup Patrol Girl: Part II. on Sat Jan 26, 2019 11:15 pm

ThePhotogsBlog

ThePhotogsBlog
Okay, a small confession; I've been building this figure's outfit from bits and pieces of stuff parted out from sets to achieve the look I want, and up until this past Thursday, she was completely without footwear. Then finally the Agent Skye boots I ordered arrived and now, she is approaching completion, or at least ready to patrol the streets of some post apocalyptic trading town in the southwest of the US, which is where my little 1/6th scale fantasy mercenary company will operate during the period known to historians as "The Great Anarchy."

11 - Post Apocalyptic Pinup Patrol Girl: Part II.   39924028533_161888ee24_b 20190126_0186 by Gary  Menten , on Flickr

I wanted lace-up boots because this is one of the newer TB League smaller figures (S24A) and I reasoned that even if the boots were too big for her, I'd be able to compensate by lacing them up tight.  You can judge for yourselves if I was correct. The boots do appear a little oversize at the feet of course, but there wasn't much I could do about that.  I also wanted tall boots, because Rod Taylor wears tall lace-up leather boots in the film Dark of The Sun, which heavily inspired the style of the uniform for this doll, and because I reasoned that operation in the American Southwest, where rattlesnakes abound, tall leather boots would be seen as better protection from snakebite than standard issue desert boots, plus...would be a hell of a lot more fashionable to this very fashion conscious mercenary unit.

11 - Post Apocalyptic Pinup Patrol Girl: Part II.   46164028334_62ab8ce40f_b 20190126_0178 by Gary  Menten , on Flickr

Overall, I'm pleased with them, though I suppose that being faux leather and from comments I've read from others, should be thoroughly washed lest they stain the figure, they will be coming off shortly for that purpose. After that, I'll have to grunge them up a bit...actually dust them up a bit, to make it look like our girl has been out on patrol. If anyone has any suggestion as to the best way of doing this, please feel free to speak up. One other point that should be made, it it's not immediately obvious to everyone, is that this sort of boot does restrict the movements of the ankle joint somewhat and can make some poses difficult to achieve. The one below took a bit of work for sure...

11 - Post Apocalyptic Pinup Patrol Girl: Part II.   39924080533_59da392589_z 20190126_0181 by Gary  Menten , on Flickr


Finally, since this figure represents a member of an organized military / mercenary unit, raised and trained by a retired officer, I decided to give her a rank, (corporal) and given my own military background and stylistic preferences, decided her chevrons should be on the British / Commonwealth style and pointing downwards. They were made by using small sections of 2 mm white tape supplied by Antheads co. in the UK glued to a piece of khaki drill fabric that had first been stiffened by applying a fabric adhesive to the other side and allowing it to dry.  This also made it much easier to cut without threads parting in every direction. A template was then applied to the other side and the shape of the backing was drawn in pencil before being cut out with a sharp #11 Exacto blade.  Tiny little strips of tape were then glued onto the backing and cut down to size once the glue had dried. Finally, the completed set of chevrons was glued to the shirt. Again, comments welcome.

11 - Post Apocalyptic Pinup Patrol Girl: Part II.   39924028823_2c8f369907_z 20190126_0162 by Gary  Menten , on Flickr

The figure is not quite complete however.  I can't imagine her patrolling in the southwest without a canteen. Also, she needs an edged weapon, and I think the perfect one would be the Dragon bayonet for the L1A1 rifle. I saw one parted out someplace and the same bayonet was designed in real life at least, to fit the Sterling SMG as well. I know, because I carried both the Canadian versions of both the rifle and sub machine gun in the Canadian Army.  I think she also needs a pouch for a least a few spare mags for her Sterling.  I'd also like to attach a lanyard between the butt of her pistol and her belt, but first have to find some string the right size.  I don't want to stick too much on her. I think less is more in this case. Again...opinions welcome.

GubernatorFan

GubernatorFan
Founding Father
They do look nice but you're right, they could do with some weathering, given the backstory. I'd suggest you check with someone who has experience dealing with stain prevention on this specific type of material. Pleather is indeed a common culprit with staining, but it is also harder to deal with than regular fabrics.


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Ephiane

Ephiane
I really enjoy to see You like the 1:6 Hobby. You get better and better. Yes, weathering could do much and a Background / Outdoor Picture

skywalkersaga

skywalkersaga
She is looking super cute! I have an even greater appreciation for your costuming choices now that I know what the look is based on, as well.  I think putting her in boots is definitely a wise choice for her context, and as everyone has concurred a touch of weathering will no doubt do wonders.

Right now, for the boots on my figures (both the plastic and the faux leather types), I have simply been using regular (Vallejo) model acrylics, either  just with primer and then as they are (for the plastic ones), or mixed with a touch of fabric medium (for the faux leather, to keep it from getting too stiff). I have been totally repainting mine, but if all you need is weathering, just some dry-brushing with these type of acrylics seems to work fine. I haven't found a need to use actual weathering kits , but then the figures I've been working on need to be able to fit in a wide variety of different settings, rather than just one type of terrain. I've likewise been using the same type of paints (once again mixed with fabric medium) on certain items of clothing, as well. How heavily I apply it and how thinned it is depends on the overall effect, and if I want the paint to sort of 'dye' the fabric, or if I want it to be more on the surface of it (for a more dusty appearance, etc).  

I'm still just starting out too, so I have no idea if any of this is useful to you, but just thought I'd share. : )


_________________
"The happy ending of the fairy tale, the myth, and the divine comedy of the soul, is to be read,
not as a contradiction, but as a transcendence of the universal tragedy of man."

Focusing on the Prequels, Clone Wars, and Original Trilogy eras (NO 'sequels', thanks!)
https://the-far-bright-center.tumblr.com/

Stryker2011

Stryker2011
Founding Father
To protect the figures from staining with things like tall boots, I wrap the legs with Seran wrap — it also makes it easier to slide them on.


_________________
Mark

He who dies with the most toys wins!

11 - Post Apocalyptic Pinup Patrol Girl: Part II.   TCFITBi

ThePhotogsBlog

ThePhotogsBlog
Stryker2011 wrote:To protect the figures from staining with things like tall boots, I wrap the legs with Seran wrap — it also makes it easier to slide them on.

Thanks Mark, I might try that. Seems like a good idea.

ThePhotogsBlog

ThePhotogsBlog
skywalkersaga wrote:She is looking super cute! I have an even greater appreciation for your costuming choices now that I know what the look is based on, as well.  I think putting her in boots is definitely a wise choice for her context, and as everyone has concurred a touch of weathering will no doubt do wonders.

Right now, for the boots on my figures (both the plastic and the faux leather types), I have simply been using regular (Vallejo) model acrylics, either  just with primer and then as they are (for the plastic ones), or mixed with a touch of fabric medium (for the faux leather, to keep it from getting too stiff). I have been totally repainting mine, but if all you need is weathering, just some dry-brushing with these type of acrylics seems to work fine. I haven't found a need to use actual weathering kits , but then the figures I've been working on need to be able to fit in a wide variety of different settings, rather than just one type of terrain. I've likewise been using the same type of paints (once again mixed with fabric medium) on certain items of clothing, as well. How heavily I apply it and how thinned it is depends on the overall effect, and if I want the paint to sort of 'dye' the fabric, or if I want it to be more on the surface of it (for a more dusty appearance, etc).  

I'm still just starting out too, so I have no idea if any of this is useful to you, but just thought I'd share. : )

Thanks. All suggestions are always appreciated. I was going to weather using acrylic paint plus maybe some chalk dust for the laces.

ThePhotogsBlog

ThePhotogsBlog
Ephiane wrote:I really enjoy to see You like the 1:6 Hobby. You get better and better. Yes, weathering could do much and a Background / Outdoor Picture

Weathering of the boots is coming soon. Outdoor shots will have to wait until Spring or Summer. It's much to cold with too much snow on the ground here in Montreal to do this right now.  I was thinking of building diorama, but I don't have much room to display or store one, so I might have to wait until the the snow melts.  I can do Photoshop hair extractions and place figures into DAZ Generated backgrounds like I did in this test image, but the process is time consuming.

11 - Post Apocalyptic Pinup Patrol Girl: Part II.   39930796213_848eef8d12_k 20190112_0109 by Gary  Menten , on Flickr

skywalkersaga

skywalkersaga
ThePhotogsBlog wrote:

Thanks.  All suggestions are always appreciated. I was going to weather using acrylic paint plus maybe some chalk dust for the laces.

Good plan!

And I completely understand about the backdrops issue -- it may not be anywhere near as cold here in the UK as it is in Montreal*, but it's often too wet/muddy/rainy for me to risk it. Not to mention my back garden is my dogs' stomping grounds, lol. And full dioramas are currently beyond my reach. My hope is to make and/or find some printed backgrounds, and just use those for now. But even that is going to take me some time, so until then I'll just be posting pics of the figures themselves as well. Nothing at all wrong with that, imo! : )

** Btw, I keep meaning to mention -- while I was born and raised in Ohio, my mom is originally from Montreal, and thus I still have many friends and relatives from both sides of my family in that area. Smile


_________________
"The happy ending of the fairy tale, the myth, and the divine comedy of the soul, is to be read,
not as a contradiction, but as a transcendence of the universal tragedy of man."

Focusing on the Prequels, Clone Wars, and Original Trilogy eras (NO 'sequels', thanks!)
https://the-far-bright-center.tumblr.com/

GubernatorFan

GubernatorFan
Founding Father
ThePhotogsBlog wrote:
Stryker2011 wrote:To protect the figures from staining with things like tall boots, I wrap the legs with Seran wrap — it also makes it easier to slide them on.

Thanks Mark,  I might try that.  Seems like a good idea.

I agree, excellent idea. But let me just caution you that in one or two surprising instances the dye transfer somehow worked itself around what I thought was a safely wrapped up part of the body. I still don't know exactly what went wrong, but hopefully you will not experience that problem. Just cover up everything carefully.

ThePhotogsBlog wrote:Outdoor shots will have to wait until Spring or Summer. It's much to cold with too much snow on the ground here in Montreal to do this right now.

And I thought you were on a desert island in the Pacific! Wink


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Stryker2011

Stryker2011
Founding Father
GubernatorFan wrote:But let me just caution you that in one or two surprising instances the dye transfer somehow worked itself around what I thought was a safely wrapped up part of the body. I still don't know exactly what went wrong

Seran wrap has a tendency to unravel fairly easily. I wrap it as tight as possible, and tape it with scotch tape to hold it in place. Very rarely have I had it move. The trick is wrapping it just right so it isn’t exposed where you don’t want it to be. If it is, take a dull, narrow tool — like a small flat-head screw-driver — and push the cellophane down until you can’t see it (but not so far that it defeats the purpose).


_________________
Mark

He who dies with the most toys wins!

11 - Post Apocalyptic Pinup Patrol Girl: Part II.   TCFITBi

ThePhotogsBlog

ThePhotogsBlog
[quote="skywalkersaga"]
ThePhotogsBlog wrote:


** Btw, I keep meaning to mention -- while I was born and raised in Ohio, my mom is originally from Montreal, and thus I still have many friends and relatives from both sides of my family in that area. Smile

Very interestingly, I have a lady friend who was born in Montreal but went to university in Ohio and stayed there afterwards. We lost track of each other until Facebook came along. Then a couple of years ago, her then job required her to come to Montreal a few times and so we saw each other for the first time in 35 years...had dinner every time she came. Lots of good conversation.

ThePhotogsBlog

ThePhotogsBlog
GubernatorFan wrote:
ThePhotogsBlog wrote:
Stryker2011 wrote:To protect the figures from staining with things like tall boots, I wrap the legs with Seran wrap — it also makes it easier to slide them on.

Thanks Mark,  I might try that.  Seems like a good idea.

I agree, excellent idea. But let me just caution you that in one or two surprising instances the dye transfer somehow worked itself around what I thought was a safely wrapped up part of the body. I still don't know exactly what went wrong, but hopefully you will not experience that problem. Just cover up everything carefully.

ThePhotogsBlog wrote:Outdoor shots will have to wait until Spring or Summer. It's much to cold with too much snow on the ground here in Montreal to do this right now.

And I thought you were on a desert island in the Pacific! Wink

I am in spirit. In corporeal form, I'm here in the Great White North.

ThePhotogsBlog

ThePhotogsBlog
Stryker2011 wrote:
GubernatorFan wrote:But let me just caution you that in one or two surprising instances the dye transfer somehow worked itself around what I thought was a safely wrapped up part of the body. I still don't know exactly what went wrong

Seran wrap has a tendency to unravel fairly easily. I wrap it as tight as possible, and tape it with scotch tape to hold it in place. Very rarely have I had it move. The trick is wrapping it just right so it isn’t exposed where you don’t want it to be. If it is, take a dull, narrow tool — like a small flat-head screw-driver — and push the cellophane down until you can’t see it (but not so far that it defeats the purpose).

That was sort of my next question actually. I've been tucking the surplus of the boot laces into the tops of the boots by the same method you describe. I find a retractable ball point with the point retracted works well for this, but wondered if the wrap would interfere. I wanted to point out that the boot insides are lined, and there is only thin strip of black down the back seam of the boot that comes into contact with the skin. Also, I have some tall hose socks from the Brit/Canadian WWII Italian campaign uniforms I've been building up and wondered if using them would be useful. Finally, I wanted to ask if you rinse the faux leather stuff like you do the clothing articles?

Stryker2011

Stryker2011
Founding Father
I’ve never tried it on boots. I have soaked “leather” jackets and pants, and haven’t had an issue doing so.


_________________
Mark

He who dies with the most toys wins!

11 - Post Apocalyptic Pinup Patrol Girl: Part II.   TCFITBi

ReverendSpooky

ReverendSpooky
Love her!!!  And the high black boots were totally the right call.  Functional, but they nail that aesthetic you're going for.  

I think they look good, but if you're not entirely happy with the fit, Very Cool did a pair a little while back that are also along the same lines, and are more of a matte leather that the shinier pleather, and have a tighter fit. I have a pair and they look great.

11 - Post Apocalyptic Pinup Patrol Girl: Part II.   8682_0

Might be hard to find now,  but could be worth a look.


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ThePhotogsBlog

ThePhotogsBlog
ReverendSpooky wrote:Love her!!!  And the high black boots were totally the right call.  Functional, but they nail that aesthetic you're going for.  

I think they look good, but if you're not entirely happy with the fit, Very Cool did a pair a little while back that are also along the same lines, and are more of a matte leather that the shinier pleather, and have a tighter fit. I have a pair and they look great.

11 - Post Apocalyptic Pinup Patrol Girl: Part II.   8682_0

Might be hard to find now,  but could be worth a look.


Thanks: I'll keep my eyes open for them as I plan to build more figures for this imaginary unit. In keeping with both DOTS and Rat Patrol, they may have more or less similar uniforms with small variations, but the high boots and short shorts would be pretty much de rigueur for the female members, while male members (few in number) would still wear tall boots as protection against snakebite.

Because of the situation, complete uniformity would be impossible and so no two members would be dressed exactly alike. It would make sense that they tried to standardize on being armed with weapons of the same caliber where possible, and frankly the logical choice for this would be AR15 variants, given the massive number of them in circulation in the US, but at the same my I want a sort of retro look and I'm not interested in building something that looks like one of these contemporary militia groups you have in America with body armor and overly dressed up M4 carbines with lots of battery powered accessories that will become useless once batteries are no longer available.

I also hold that in an SHTF situation, any firearm that's functional and for which ammo is available in any quantity will be worth it's weight in gold. Even the lowly .22 rifle, which is excellent for small game hunting and pest control, etc.

Stryker2011

Stryker2011
Founding Father
Have you thought of putting boot gaiters on some of them in lieu of high boots?


_________________
Mark

He who dies with the most toys wins!

11 - Post Apocalyptic Pinup Patrol Girl: Part II.   TCFITBi

ReverendSpooky

ReverendSpooky
ThePhotogsBlog wrote:Thanks:  I'll keep my eyes open for them as I plan to build more figures for this imaginary unit.  In keeping with both DOTS and Rat Patrol, they may have more or less similar uniforms with small variations, but the high boots and short shorts would be pretty much de rigueur for the female members, while male members (few in number) would still wear tall boots as protection against snakebite.

Because of the situation, complete uniformity would be impossible and so no two members would be dressed exactly alike. It would make sense that they tried to standardize on being armed with weapons of the same caliber where possible, and frankly the logical choice for this would be AR15 variants, given the massive number of them in circulation in the US, but at the same my I want a sort of retro look and I'm not interested in building something that looks like one of these contemporary militia groups you have in America with body armor and overly dressed up M4 carbines with lots of battery powered accessories that will become useless once batteries are no longer available.  

I also hold that in an SHTF situation, any firearm that's functional and for which ammo is available in any quantity will be worth it's weight in gold. Even the lowly .22 rifle, which is excellent for small game hunting and pest control, etc.

I completely hear you.  And I think things being a bit mismatched, as well as the diversity of the weapons, is what lends it that post-apocalyptic look.  Things being a bit imperfect, and looking scavenged or repaired is what sets it apart from simply looking too modern.  And I can't even say why, but the older guns really do just seem to fit the look, don't they?


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ThePhotogsBlog

ThePhotogsBlog
Stryker2011 wrote:Have you thought of putting boot gaiters on some of them in lieu of high boots?

Some WWII style leggings possibly. I also have some puttees such as the British army wore in the western desert and Brit/Canadian troops wore in Italy over the hated gaiters issued to both armies, but my thought is that the puttees, which work well at keeping the sand out of the boots will do nothing against snakebite. Probably the same goes for canvas leggings.

ThePhotogsBlog

ThePhotogsBlog
ReverendSpooky wrote:
ThePhotogsBlog wrote:Thanks:  I'll keep my eyes open for them as I plan to build more figures for this imaginary unit.  In keeping with both DOTS and Rat Patrol, they may have more or less similar uniforms with small variations, but the high boots and short shorts would be pretty much de rigueur for the female members, while male members (few in number) would still wear tall boots as protection against snakebite.

Because of the situation, complete uniformity would be impossible and so no two members would be dressed exactly alike. It would make sense that they tried to standardize on being armed with weapons of the same caliber where possible, and frankly the logical choice for this would be AR15 variants, given the massive number of them in circulation in the US, but at the same my I want a sort of retro look and I'm not interested in building something that looks like one of these contemporary militia groups you have in America with body armor and overly dressed up M4 carbines with lots of battery powered accessories that will become useless once batteries are no longer available.  

I also hold that in an SHTF situation, any firearm that's functional and for which ammo is available in any quantity will be worth it's weight in gold. Even the lowly .22 rifle, which is excellent for small game hunting and pest control, etc.

I completely hear you.  And I think things being a bit mismatched, as well as the diversity of the weapons, is what lends it that post-apocalyptic look.  Things being a bit imperfect, and looking scavenged or repaired is what sets it apart from simply looking too modern.  And I can't even say why, but the older guns really do just seem to fit the look, don't they?

Older guns fit the look for a number of reasons. One...old surplus military guns are generally more available to civilians before the brown stuff hits the fan than modern ones. Two, they are usually much easier to maintain than a lot of older ones. I have a gun collection myself and can guarantee that a WWII (or WWI) Lee-Enfield is easier to keep clean than an AR15. In the AR's favor, the modern market for the is so huge, even here in Canada where they are restricted weapons available only to members of clubs certified for restricted weapons. Consequently, the availability of spare parts for them and after market accessories is huge. Given that they use the same ammo and magazines as both the US and Canadian (and many other armies use) they are the logical choice of weapons for a survivalist/prepper to own. The thing is...how many AR15's is the average gun owner, or even prepper going to own? I own exactly one. Sure, there are people who collect them, but my thoughts are that few people who own them own more than one. The second thing is that most of the gizmo's the wanna-be militia's like to load them down with will be totally useless once their last batteries are gone.

Consider now the lowly SKS carbine or Type 56 if it's Chinese. Tens of thousands sold just in Canada, starting around $225.00 and with loads of cheap ammo for them also available. I can't even begin to guess how many have been sold in America. In the unlikely even that the giant asteroid or whatever hits us and we suffer a massive interruption of services, surplus SKS's will be among the most commonly seen weapons, along with every type of 12-guage shotgun under the sun...at least until the ammo runs out.

ThePhotogsBlog

ThePhotogsBlog
Stryker2011 wrote:To protect the figures from staining with things like tall boots, I wrap the legs with Seran wrap — it also makes it easier to slide them on.


I tried this out after first rinsing and drying the boots, then weathering them. It works well and the boots look a lot better now that they have a dusty look about them.

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