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NEW PRODUCT: POPTOYS: 1/6 EX22 King Henry V of England, double head sculptures & horse

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Stryker2011

Stryker2011
Founding Father
POPTOYS 1/6 EX22 King Henry V of England with two heads

POPTOYS 1/6 EX22 King Henry V of England-- Figure
BAR CODE: 6971281620741
List:

Young head*1
Head with beard*1
Body*1
Gloved hands*4
Red undershirt*1
Scarf*1
Pants*1 pair
Boots*1 pair
Upper body chain armor*1
Shoulder armor*2
Upper plate armor*1
Dagger (with scabbard)*1
Sword (with scabbard)*1
Leather belt*2
Imperial crown*1
Sleeveless robe*1
Figure stand*1
.................................................. ...............
POPTOYS 1/6 EX22 King Henry V of England –War horse

List:

Horse*1
Saddle*1
Stirrup*2
Horse face belt*1
Rein*1
Leather liner*1
Front belt*1
Back belt*1

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#newproduct #PopToys #KingHenryV #male #medieval #movie-based #horse #animal

GubernatorFan

GubernatorFan
Founding Father
I'm not at all sure about some of the details (most notably the armor), but it does look pretty neat. It might be based on one of the renditions of the Shakespeare play, although I haven't tried researching this.


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blackpool

blackpool
I made some googling as the likeness was very strong to Tom Hiddlestone (Loki!)

It appears to be based on a tv movie from UK, adapted from shakespear's "hollow crown", henry V being the final part...

Here are some images, I find the set very accurate and well executed, at least that proto... very promising!

NEW PRODUCT: POPTOYS: 1/6 EX22 King Henry V of England, double head sculptures & horse F6d4552a49a2a24b97ce7884dc6282d3

NEW PRODUCT: POPTOYS: 1/6 EX22 King Henry V of England, double head sculptures & horse MV5BMTEyYTc1MjMtNjI4Yy00MmU1LTkxZDktNzhkYjY3NTlhNjgzXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyMjMxMDgyNzU@._V1_SY1000_CR0,0,1429,1000_AL_

Stryker2011

Stryker2011
Founding Father
Good catch, blackpool. Haven’t seen that version, but I did like the Kenneth Brannagh version that came out twenty + years ago.


_________________
Mark

He who dies with the most toys wins!

NEW PRODUCT: POPTOYS: 1/6 EX22 King Henry V of England, double head sculptures & horse TCFITBi

GubernatorFan

GubernatorFan
Founding Father
I had seen the movie but a while back -- must have been reacting to a vague memory of the actor's face, although the outfit didn't ring a bell anymore.

And here is the real Henry V... if only Tom had shaved and gotten a bowl cut...
NEW PRODUCT: POPTOYS: 1/6 EX22 King Henry V of England, double head sculptures & horse 232px-King_Henry_V_from_NPG


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shazzdan

shazzdan
I'm glad it is based on a movie because it has no basis in history.


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skywalkersaga

skywalkersaga
It’s from The Hollow Crown! Smile He was of course very good in the role, but I did find the costumes rather annoying. The first entry about Richard II was also excellent imo; I would have preferred figures made from that one.

That being said, I like the tack on the horse, even if this overly fantasy looking PopToys horse doesn’t really do it for me. But I’d get it just for the tack, as it would work for some medieval fantasy kitbashes I want to do ( in distant future, but one can never plan too far with these things...)

https://the-far-bright-center.tumblr.com/

ThePhotogsBlog

ThePhotogsBlog
GubernatorFan wrote:I'm not at all sure about some of the details (most notably the armor), but it does look pretty neat. It might be based on one of the renditions of the Shakespeare play, although I haven't tried researching this.

To answer your question, in the late 14th and early 15th century, armor for a person of this stature would consist of full plate over mail. He would have been covered from head to foot.

ThePhotogsBlog

ThePhotogsBlog
shazzdan wrote:I'm glad it is based on a movie because it has no basis in history.

Exactly right. He should be wearing full plate armor and have a chili bowl haircut.

lurpdog101

lurpdog101
Yeah this is based on that TV Show. It looks to be a really good figure and one on my to be purchased list has

https://www.hellblazerbiz.com

Delanie

Delanie
Does anyone actually Know what he wore at Agincourt?which is why I'd be interested in the Bow from the other set

I also wonder at the accuracy of some of the pictorial descriptions of famous people from the middle ages and even beyond

lurpdog101

lurpdog101
Delanie wrote:Does anyone actually Know what he wore at Agincourt?which is why I'd be interested in the Bow from the other set

I also wonder at the accuracy of some of the pictorial descriptions of famous people  from the middle ages and even beyond

this is based on the info from website agincourt600.com

When Henry V’s army departed in August 1415, between a quarter and a fifth of the soldiers were men-at-arms.

Most of these were of the status of esquire – indeed this term was often used in the muster rolls to describe them – and were paid one shilling per day (twice the rate of pay of an archer). Some were of noble and knightly rank and received higher rates of pay based on their social status. A duke, for instance, was paid 13 s 4d per day. In addition, captains received an additional payment (a regard) for their men-at-arms which was set at 100 marks for every 30 men at arms for every three month period. This was in recognition of the higher costs men-at-arms incurred in terms of equipment and armour.

Whatever their social status, these were all men who had been trained in arms and in horsemanship from an early age. In a battle situation such as Agincourt, they would fight on foot, armed with lances, swords and other staff weapons.

By 1415, fully articulated suits of plate armour, known as ‘white armour’ (harnois blanc) were in use by the men-at-arms. This included the use of various items such as breastplates, gorgets, rerebraces and sallets to protect different parts of the body. This equipment was vital for keeping a man-at-arms alive in the mêlée (the hand-to hand fighting in a battle).

Here is a brief glossary:

Bascinet – a type of helmet

Gauntlets – armoured gloves

Gorget – neck armour

Greaves – shin armour

Hauberk – a long mail shirt

Pairs of plates – cloth armour with riveted plates inside

Poleyns – knee armour

Rerebrace – upper arm armour

Sabaton – foot armour

Sallet – a type of helmet

https://www.hellblazerbiz.com

Delanie

Delanie
Thanks for the Info Lurpdog it just occurred to me that what with the 'bowman' figure they might make a good set giving his classic lines from Shakespeare and was wondering if he would have had the full plate considering the terrain and weather at that time.

that being said I also wonder about the size of his shield it seems quite small from what i remember at Warwick

lurpdog101

lurpdog101
I hear you. He could well have originally had full plate armour. This is based on the tv show though, and I just looked it up and it is pretty good likeness on that front.

"He that shall live this day, and see old age,
Will yearly on the vigil feast his neighbours,
And say 'To-morrow is Saint Crispian:'
Then will he strip his sleeve and show his scars.
And say 'These wounds I had on Crispin's day."

NEW PRODUCT: POPTOYS: 1/6 EX22 King Henry V of England, double head sculptures & horse Images10

https://www.hellblazerbiz.com

shazzdan

shazzdan
Delanie wrote:that being said I also wonder about the size of his shield it seems quite small from what i remember at Warwick

Doesn't matter what size it is because he never had one. It would be inaccurate no matter now big it is. There would not be much point wearing full plate if it couldn't stop an attack without the assistance of a shield. One advantage of full plate is that it enabled the shield to be discarded, which allowed two-handed weapons became prevalent, which leads us to another problem with this figure. Henry's primary weapon would have been a two-handed polearm not a sword. The sword would have been drawn only after his other weapons had been broken/disarmed.

and was wondering if he would have had the full plate considering the terrain and weather at that time.

Yes he wore full plate; all the nobility did at the time. Armour has never been selected based on the climate. We know that some of the heaviest and most stifling armours ever invented were worn in summer campaigns in the Middle East. I have personally worn these kinds of armours in the middle of an Australian summer with no more discomfort than regular clothing.

What causes heat issues is enclosed helmets. If the head is ventilated, a person can tolerate far higher degrees of heat. At the battle of Towton the prolonged melee caused some knights in enclosed helmets to collapse from heat exhaustion even though they were fighting in a snowstorm.


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Delanie

Delanie
The thing I was thinking of was and it may not have been Agincourt were the boggy fields which prevented the heavily armoured French Cavalry and maybe even foot attacking effectively, in fact im sure i read that some had to remove their plate to escape the mud. so i thought perhaps knowing this Henry v may have worn lighter armour.


with regard to plate and shield were there not shields with cut outs to allow lances and swords to be used in conjunction?

I get what you are saying with regard to the weapons though as many weapons could not penetrate full plate unless they found a joint and even the 2 handed great sword was in effect a bludgeoning weapon either incapacitating the wearer by decreasing mobility or inflicting damage on the person beneath by concussion or restricting breathing or blood flow

shazzdan

shazzdan
Delanie wrote:with regard to plate and shield were there not shields with cut outs to allow lances and swords to be used in conjunction?
Only in tournaments. The shield was an integral part of the game.

I get what you are saying with regard to the weapons though as many weapons could not penetrate full plate unless they found a joint
How do you do this with a one handed weapon? You can't fight someone in full plate if you have a shield because both hands are needed for armour-compromising weapons. Even lower ranked soldiers with little armour did away with shields and adopted two handed weapons.

and even the 2 handed great sword was in effect a bludgeoning weapon either incapacitating the wearer by decreasing mobility or inflicting damage on the person beneath by concussion or restricting breathing or blood flow.

Two-handed swords were used like polearms to penetrate armour gaps. Thrusting attacks were prevalent.


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shazzdan

shazzdan
lurpdog101 wrote:Hauberk – a long mail shirt

He probably didn't wear a hauberk. Arming doublets with mail voiders start to appear at the end of the 14th century. His armour would have been pointed to the doublet rather than strapped over a hauberk.

Pairs of plates – cloth armour with riveted plates inside

By this time, uncovered solid cuirasses were being worn (hence the term "all white"); pairs of plates were being phased out. The king would definitely not have worn something so old-fashioned; he was on the cutting edge of armour development. So, in this regard, the above figure is accurate.


Trivia sidebar: At the time, the word "pair" did not refer to two items. It referred to a group of related items. The closest modern translation would be "set of plates". Most armour researchers refer to this armour as a "coat of plates" to avoid confusion.


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Rogerbee

Rogerbee
Founding Father

Probably wouldn't have sold if they'd done a historically accurate figure. They wanted to ride on the coat tails of HT's success without copying Loki.

CHEERS!

lurpdog101

lurpdog101
shazzdan wrote:
lurpdog101 wrote:Hauberk – a long mail shirt

He probably didn't wear a hauberk. Arming doublets with mail voiders start to appear at the end of the 14th century. His armour would have been pointed to the doublet rather than strapped over a hauberk.

Pairs of plates – cloth armour with riveted plates inside

By this time, uncovered solid cuirasses were being worn (hence the term "all white"); pairs of plates were being phased out. The king would definitely not have worn something so old-fashioned; he was on the cutting edge of armour development. So, in this regard, the above figure is accurate.


Trivia sidebar: At the time, the word "pair" did not refer to two items. It referred to a group of related items. The closest modern translation would be "set of plates". Most armour researchers refer to this armour as a "coat of plates" to avoid confusion.

The info I had wasn't directly for the King, as said, was taken from a historical website for Agincourt and seems to be general soldier.

https://www.hellblazerbiz.com

shazzdan

shazzdan
lurpdog101 wrote:The info I had wasn't directly for the King, as said, was taken from a historical website for Agincourt and seems to be general soldier.

Less wealthy or provincial men at arms would still be wearing the older kit but the wealthy or ambitious nobles and everyone who attended court regularly would have been wearing modern armour.


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ThePhotogsBlog

ThePhotogsBlog
Probably the only really accurate thing about this figure is the sword, which looks very much like the one purported to be Henry V's and appears to be an Oakshott type XVIII  as these things are classified. This being said, I see no reason not to buy this figure if you happen to really like it.

lurpdog101

lurpdog101
The love of this figure has led me back to look into history, as it's admittedly been a long time since I studied Henry V, both the historical figure and the Shakespearean one.

I was fascinated to (re)learn that in Henry's youth, he gained battle experience fighting against Owain Glyndŵr, leading army against him when he was only 15/16 years old! Owain Glyndŵr was the last native Welshman to hold the title Prince of Wales (the title of which was bestowed on Henry)

Owain Glyndŵr has a lot of history where I live, and I recall in my youth, our home on Anglesey, well, my parents cottage we went to on holidays (but as my dad was a minister, it was actually their own home) had graffiti on, and lucky not to have been firebombed like others in the village, by the "Sons of Glyndŵr" and within 50 miles I could reach either Owain Glyndŵr court in Macynlleth or where he held court in Harlech!

So my talk of wanting to photograph the figure in a local castle, would be amazing to have it done in Harlech Castle, where I am sure he must have fought. He was also given a title of Earl of Chester, which again, is within 30 minute drive.

Sorry for the ramble, but I do love history and am ashamed I forget a lot of it...so really pleased this figure has reignited my interest to read into it.

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shazzdan

shazzdan
ThePhotogsBlog wrote:Probably the only really accurate thing about this figure is the sword, which looks very much like the one purported to be Henry V's and appears to be an Oakshott type XVIII  as these things are classified.  This being said, I see no reason not to buy this figure if you happen to really like it.  

It has lots of pieces that would be excellent in other builds, just not this one.


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ThePhotogsBlog

ThePhotogsBlog
shazzdan wrote:
ThePhotogsBlog wrote:Probably the only really accurate thing about this figure is the sword, which looks very much like the one purported to be Henry V's and appears to be an Oakshott type XVIII  as these things are classified.  This being said, I see no reason not to buy this figure if you happen to really like it.  

It has lots of pieces that would be excellent in other builds, just not this one.


An interesting observation.

GubernatorFan

GubernatorFan
Founding Father
Let's not forget that ultimately they are recreating the imagery seen in a particular film. Historical accuracy would have been nice (and for me far preferable), but screen accuracy was their objective.


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Lynkhart

Lynkhart
Ignoring all the obvious historical inaccuracies, I still think this is a damn good figure. The likeness to Hiddleston is very good, (although I’m getting a real Christian Bale vibe from the clean shaven head for some reason!) and I absolutely adore that red doublet! The shading on the armour is a little crude and the less said about the horse the better though.


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lurpdog101

lurpdog101
GubernatorFan wrote:Let's not forget that ultimately they are recreating the imagery seen in a particular film. Historical accuracy would have been nice (and for me far preferable), but screen accuracy was their objective.

Exactly. This figure is based on the BBC TV series The Hollow Crown, which was a take on Shakespeare's plays based on the English kings....the costume is spot on for that and also for most theatrical portrayals...even if not historically accurate it is a great rendition.

https://www.hellblazerbiz.com

shazzdan

shazzdan
It would be easy to turn him into a half decent viking. Get rid of the cuirass and leave the hauberk. He can keep his pants, boots, and belt. Change the sword, shield, and helmet. Give him a seax or hatchet. Done.


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skywalkersaga

skywalkersaga
Shazzdan, I get what you're saying about kitbash potential, but the boots.....those look nothing like Viking boots to me. confused

And yes, for all these recent figures -- this Henry V, the Robin Hood, and the Henry VIII -- they are being based on the film/show versions. So while discussions of historical accuracy are fascinating, they are kind of moot in relation to the aim of what the figures based on/trying to convey.

In regards to this figure in particular, if one bears in mind that it's based not only on a miniseries, but also on a Shakespeare play at that, the lack of historical accuracy is much more understandable. Even in Shakespeare's day, it's not as if these historical figures were being portrayed with precise accuracy, either. Wink Essentially, it's a contemporary take on what was already, in its time, a piece of historical fiction.  Not to mention that it is common practice in Shakespeare productions for the costumes to be less than 'accurate'. I remember watching the televised production of Coriolanus, also starring Tom Hiddleston, and that was a play set in Rome, shortly after the expulsion of the Tarquin kings, but was written in the early 1600s, and being portrayed in the 21st century. The costumes in that version were what I can only describe as 'modern fantasy'. And yet, it worked. Because ultimately it's about the artistry of the staging and the overall performance, rather than how 'accurate' it is. Smile


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not as a contradiction, but as a transcendence of the universal tragedy of man."

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ThePhotogsBlog

ThePhotogsBlog
skywalkersaga wrote:Shazzdan, I get what you're saying about kitbash potential, but the boots.....those look nothing like Viking boots to me. confused

And yes, for all these recent figures -- this Henry V, the Robin Hood, and the Henry VIII -- they are being based on the film/show versions. So while discussions of historical accuracy are fascinating, they are kind of moot in relation to the aim of what the figures based on/trying to convey.

In regards to this figure in particular, if one bears in mind that it's based not only on a miniseries, but also on a Shakespeare play at that, the lack of historical accuracy is much more understandable. Even in Shakespeare's day, it's not as if these historical figures were being portrayed with precise accuracy, either. Wink Essentially, it's a contemporary take on what was already, in its time, a piece of historical fiction.  Not to mention that it is common practice in Shakespeare productions for the costumes to be less than 'accurate'. I remember watching the televised production of Coriolanus, also starring Tom Hiddleston, and that was a play set in Rome, shortly after the expulsion of the Tarquin kings, but was written in the early 1600s, and being portrayed in the 21st century. The costumes in that version were what I can only describe as 'modern fantasy'. And yet, it worked. Because ultimately it's about the artistry of the staging and the overall performance, rather than how 'accurate' it is. Smile

You can take this a step farther.  Shakespeare, like the great movie director John Ford, or the frontiersman turned showman William F. Cody (Buffalo Bill) was not particularly interested in giving his audiences a history lesson, and certainly all of their presentations contained inaccuracies or anachronisms in dress, despite also containing story elements that were more or less historically accurate and it worked.  Buffalo Bill is more remembered as a showman than a frontier scout, John Ford won best director Oscars that any director in history, and William Shakespeare who wrote about universal themes that are as relevant today as they were in his day, is considered by most, to be the greatest playwright and author of fiction in the history of the English language.

Delanie

Delanie
Hey! I was wondering what Lynheart would say about the horses they kind of strike me as a bit like the disney rapunzel horse what ever he was called, there just seems to be something not quite right about them in my book but cant put my finger on it.

ThePhotogsBlog

ThePhotogsBlog
Delanie wrote:Hey! I was wondering what Lynheart would say about the horses they kind of strike me as a bit like the disney rapunzel horse what ever he was called, there just seems to be something not quite right about them in my book but cant put my finger on it.

Knights of this era typically had two horses. A riding horse for getting from place to place, and a larger, heavier war horse, which would have also been heavily armored. Maybe that's what's striking you as not quite right?

skywalkersaga

skywalkersaga
Delanie wrote:Hey! I was wondering what Lynheart would say about the horses they kind of strike me as a bit like the disney rapunzel horse what ever he was called, there just seems to be something not quite right about them in my book but cant put my finger on it.

In my opinion, there are several things 'off' about these PopToys horses, including the sort of awkward pose (walking? standing? who knows, lol) along with the position/shape of the legs and hooves. There are other conformation flaws, but those definitely stand out.

But the most egregious thing from my perspective is the shape of the head. The head on this horse is entirely unrealistic and looks more like a child's toy horse or even a fantastical creature altogether, rather than a truly realistic 1/6 scale version of an actual horse's head.


_________________
"The happy ending of the fairy tale, the myth, and the divine comedy of the soul, is to be read,
not as a contradiction, but as a transcendence of the universal tragedy of man."

Focusing on the Prequels, Clone Wars, and Original Trilogy eras (NO 'sequels', thanks!)
https://the-far-bright-center.tumblr.com/

Delanie

Delanie
I think as Skywalkersaga pointed out it's the general conformation and the shape of the head that's off. the muzzle is just too pointed

ThePhotogsBlog

ThePhotogsBlog
Delanie wrote:I think as Skywalkersaga pointed out it's the general conformation and the shape of the head that's off. the muzzle is just too pointed

I think that may be because the head seems (to me) to be a bit on the short side and should be more elongated.

skywalkersaga

skywalkersaga
The only way to describe it is to compare photos...

Here's the PopToys horse's head:

NEW PRODUCT: POPTOYS: 1/6 EX22 King Henry V of England, double head sculptures & horse 22052010

And here are some images of grey Andalusian horses from similar angle:

NEW PRODUCT: POPTOYS: 1/6 EX22 King Henry V of England, double head sculptures & horse 69e70a10

NEW PRODUCT: POPTOYS: 1/6 EX22 King Henry V of England, double head sculptures & horse 8e8bd210


NEW PRODUCT: POPTOYS: 1/6 EX22 King Henry V of England, double head sculptures & horse A9dffc10




Obviously, the precise size and shape of a horse's head varies a bit depending on the breed -- I used Andalusians simply because they seemed the closest to the 'fairytale' vibe that this PopToys horse is trying to evoke.


_________________
"The happy ending of the fairy tale, the myth, and the divine comedy of the soul, is to be read,
not as a contradiction, but as a transcendence of the universal tragedy of man."

Focusing on the Prequels, Clone Wars, and Original Trilogy eras (NO 'sequels', thanks!)
https://the-far-bright-center.tumblr.com/

ThePhotogsBlog

ThePhotogsBlog
skywalkersaga wrote:The only way to describe it is to compare photos...

Here's the PopToys horse's head:

NEW PRODUCT: POPTOYS: 1/6 EX22 King Henry V of England, double head sculptures & horse 22052010

And here are some images of grey Andalusian horses from similar angle:

NEW PRODUCT: POPTOYS: 1/6 EX22 King Henry V of England, double head sculptures & horse 69e70a10

NEW PRODUCT: POPTOYS: 1/6 EX22 King Henry V of England, double head sculptures & horse 8e8bd210


NEW PRODUCT: POPTOYS: 1/6 EX22 King Henry V of England, double head sculptures & horse A9dffc10






Obviously, the precise size and shape of a horse's head varies a bit depending on the breed -- I used Andalusians simply because they seemed the closest to the 'fairytale' vibe that this PopToys horse is trying to evoke.


It seems to me the Andalusians have noticeably longer heads.

skywalkersaga

skywalkersaga
Yeah.... note also the size, shape, and placement of the eyes on the PopToys model in comparison to the photos of real horses.


_________________
"The happy ending of the fairy tale, the myth, and the divine comedy of the soul, is to be read,
not as a contradiction, but as a transcendence of the universal tragedy of man."

Focusing on the Prequels, Clone Wars, and Original Trilogy eras (NO 'sequels', thanks!)
https://the-far-bright-center.tumblr.com/

ThePhotogsBlog

ThePhotogsBlog
skywalkersaga wrote:Yeah.... note also the size, shape, and placement of the eyes on the PopToys model in comparison to the photos of real horses.

good point

Lynkhart

Lynkhart
They’re just off! I can’t really pinpoint the exact issue which probably means there’s more wrong with it than right! Laughing The head looks too small, the ears are weird, the feet and legs look very odd indeed and the general pose just looks awkward and uncomfortable.

My main hobby other than 1/6th figs is model horses, and if this were to be marketed to that hobby it’d  be an utter failure as there’s absolutely no comparison to the limited run artist resins and even the mass produced factory made models we collect and customise.


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skywalkersaga

skywalkersaga
9Lynkhart wrote:They’re just off! I can’t really pinpoint the exact issue which probably means there’s more wrong with it than right! Laughing The head looks too small, the ears are weird, the feet and legs look very odd indeed and the general pose just looks awkward and uncomfortable.

My main hobby other than 1/6th figs is model horses, and if this were to be marketed to that hobby it’d  be an utter failure as there’s absolutely no comparison to the limited run artist resins and even the mass produced factory made models we collect and customise.

Yes, agreed. It is indeed too difficult to explain, unless one simply...knows. Hence me resorting to pics to attempt to illustrate. ;p

And yess, I greatly admire your work on model horses! Smile Model horses have always been my first and best love in terms of collectibles. While I never ventured into customizing or into the super higher end side of it, I did love my Breyers growing up -- and, imo, even the least impressive Breyer model is still miles more believable as an equine sculpture than the above 1/6 'horse'. Razz


_________________
"The happy ending of the fairy tale, the myth, and the divine comedy of the soul, is to be read,
not as a contradiction, but as a transcendence of the universal tragedy of man."

Focusing on the Prequels, Clone Wars, and Original Trilogy eras (NO 'sequels', thanks!)
https://the-far-bright-center.tumblr.com/

Delanie

Delanie
I'm glad it wasn't just me Ladies!

I think I kind of want this figure but will get another horse for the Scene I have in mind.


As an aside I have the brown / red IIL horse hopefully on its way from machinegun

skywalkersaga

skywalkersaga
Delanie wrote:I'm glad it wasn't just me Ladies!

I think I kind of want this figure but will get another horse for the Scene I have in mind.


As an aside I have the brown / red IIL horse hopefully on its way from machinegun
 
Oh, I'm envious.... I missed out on the Ili horses.  Sad


_________________
"The happy ending of the fairy tale, the myth, and the divine comedy of the soul, is to be read,
not as a contradiction, but as a transcendence of the universal tragedy of man."

Focusing on the Prequels, Clone Wars, and Original Trilogy eras (NO 'sequels', thanks!)
https://the-far-bright-center.tumblr.com/

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