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Building an RC sixth scale Jeep

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1 Building an RC sixth scale Jeep on Tue Oct 23, 2018 3:44 pm

I reckon this is the swift kick in the ass I've needed...

Yesterday, I posted an old video of my first RC Jeep...well, the first build using nice components. Eph mentioned she'd like to see a build post. Truth is, I did one, but it was over at the old site (onto which I cannot even get any longer) and the photos were all linked through that bucket-o-photos site.

Time to do something different.

With the aid of a $2 app, I retrieved my photos from the other site (since that site had disabled the ability to bulk download photos from albums) and began moving them to another hosting site.

The goal is to try and reconstruct the build process and thread here. It's going to have to be in stages, as I cannot (will not) sit in front of my screens for hours on end to do it all in one sitting.

Installment I

I've been building stuff since I was 11 years old. The thing is, adulthood has put a serious crimp in my playtime.

Well, it's time...

It all started a while back when I decided to redo an old Soldiers Of The World Willys Jeep that I'd made remote controlled for my kids. Basically what had been done before was a rush, hack job. I took an old hobby grade RC buggy that was about shot and transferred pieces and parts to the Jeep.

It wasn't great work, but it was damn fast (to the point that I had to strap the action figures to their seats to keep them from being slung out in hard turns).   Cool

Here's where the build started:











Not much to look at, right?

So, I gathered up some of my helpers and I had a chat with them about what I wanted to do.

The reception was...um...less than enthusiastic, to say the least.







So, I started without them. They'd either get on board, or get left behind.






Finally, I got some begrudging approval.








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2 Re: Building an RC sixth scale Jeep on Tue Oct 23, 2018 4:55 pm

GubernatorFan

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Great start! Although I thought the jeep looked pretty good to begin with. But then again I know next to nothing of such things.


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3 Re: Building an RC sixth scale Jeep on Tue Oct 23, 2018 7:23 pm

LOL...don't you hate it when the minions talk back? Anyway, I can't wait to see where this goes...

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4 Re: Building an RC sixth scale Jeep on Wed Oct 24, 2018 3:36 am

A very brave project dadrab, I wouldn't have clue where to start, love the use of the photo story too.


Cheers,


Peter.

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5 Re: Building an RC sixth scale Jeep on Wed Oct 24, 2018 4:30 am

Great Making of ! You do it with maximum difficult level and choose not a RC Car Kit Shocked

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6 Re: Building an RC sixth scale Jeep on Wed Oct 24, 2018 12:01 pm

GubernatorFan wrote:Great start! Although I thought the jeep looked pretty good to begin with. But then again I know next to nothing of such things.

Thank you, GF. It wasn't bad, but hardly anything about it was remotely realistic. Plus, when I hacked the first incarnation together, there were no scale solid axles or drive shafts or anything like that even available. When I discovered those, it was elementary that there'd be a rebuild. It was also terrible on rugged terrain...all speed and not much torque.


Mr. Razz wrote:LOL...don't you hate it when the minions talk back? Anyway, I can't wait to see where this goes...

Looking forward to having along, Razz. Thank you.

Yep, those smartass figures can really piss me off, sometimes... Very Happy


peter the painter wrote:A very brave project dadrab, I wouldn't have clue where to start, love the use of the photo story too.
Cheers,
Peter.

Thank you, Peter. As I said, I've been building RC stuff for a long time now. I just start laying stuff out where it makes sense. Sometimes it works; other times one has to make it work.


Ephiane wrote:Great Making of ! You do it with maximum difficult level and choose not a RC Car Kit Shocked

Thank you very much, Ephiane. I haven't really built much for my personal use using a kit in many years. Built a few things for friends with them, though. Nothing against kits, mind you, but I like the challenge and prefer to modify as I go (rather than taking stuff back apart to mod).


Installment II

Here're are a few more shots of what I was working with:







All that had to be taken apart. So, this is what was left:






Needed some axles. Axial (name of a predominant RC manufacturer) provided the solution for those as well as a transmission.







These sub-assemblies I did build from a parted out kit.


And, of course, I'd need a chassis. This was hand cut from a piece of aluminum bar stock. Not bad for a first attempt. As you all can see, I opted for leaf springs instead of shocks and coils. They are made from ordinary rake tynes, heated and shaped; then, reheated and retempered to provide some "spring."  The shackles are made from chain links; brackets are hand made.










More to come...

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7 Re: Building an RC sixth scale Jeep on Wed Oct 24, 2018 1:58 pm

Man, this is some SERIOUS work. Just watched the video in the other thread, so I know it comes out awesome. RC cars, and the kind of work that goes in to them, are such a whole different world to me. I can handle cosmetic mods, but this type of technical, functional work feels like straight sorcery. And damn, it looks like you've got some great space to run this thing. Love seeing your crew of helpers too. Hell of a fun build thread.

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8 Re: Building an RC sixth scale Jeep on Thu Oct 25, 2018 10:56 am

ReverendSpooky wrote:Man, this is some SERIOUS work.  Just watched the video in the other thread, so I know it comes out awesome.  RC cars, and the kind of work that goes in to them, are such a whole different world to me.  I can handle cosmetic mods, but this type of technical, functional work feels like straight sorcery.  And damn, it looks like you've got some great space to run this thing.  Love seeing your crew of helpers too.  Hell of a fun build thread.  

Much appreciated, Rev. It was a lot of work, but worth it in the end. It's pretty fun...when I have time to go do anything with it.  Rolling Eyes

I understand your apprehension, too. For the longest time, I was fascinated, but a little scared at the same time. Most all RC stuff when I began in the hobby was airborne. I don't think I could have stood to crash something that so much work had gone into. Then, I discovered RC boats. The boat hobby is huge in Europe (maybe other places, too), but not so popular in the US. That's where it all began. My logic was thus: If I screw up a boat, the worst that can happen is that it will sink. I swim really well and can dive, so not much of a problem.

There was the time, though, I took a new creation out for a cruise on a lake and lost power to the props. I could hear the motor running, but no movement. Had to swim about 200 yards out into the lake, retrieve the boat and swim back...IN MARCH. Make no mistake...that damn water as was cold as a witch's thorax.

By the way, the trail that video was shot on is that of a local disc golf course not far from our house. My kids and I play there all the time. The footpath is about right for a sixth scale dirt road.  Cool

But, I digress...


Installment III

Since I was using leaf springs, I had to design and make a set of U-bolts and plates to attach axles to suspension. It wasn't much trouble, to tell the truth. I just used all-threaded rod, heated it up a bit and bent it around a template about the same size as the axle diameter. The plates are just pieces of aluminum bar cut and drilled to fit. Pretty much the same as a 1:1 Jeep or pickup.

A lot of Dremeling going on there...
 Smile








Of course, I had plenty of help from the guys.




And, they tried to do a lot of the work themselves. Still, I believe they were glad to see me from time to time.

Below, my boy Maxx Steele bit off a little more than he could chew trying to install the RC4WD Killer transfer case by himself.





Another one of the guys talked me into the notion that my rake tyne springs were too stiff. He gave me the idea of making another set out of Walmart stainless steel rulers. They were pretty easy to cut, but a bear to heat, bend and retemper. Once they were in, though they worked really well. The trouble was, the further along the build went, the heavier the Jeep got. Turns out I went back to the rake-tyne springs after all, but don't tell the guys. Some of them are kind of thin-skinned, as we've seen.

*NOTE* Below, you can see the drive shafts attached to both axles and the transfer case.



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9 Re: Building an RC sixth scale Jeep on Thu Oct 25, 2018 11:39 am

Looks way too technical for me Ed, but very entertaining to see.



Cheers,

Peter.

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10 Re: Building an RC sixth scale Jeep on Thu Oct 25, 2018 12:58 pm

You are the 1:6 Mac Gyver Very Happy

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11 Re: Building an RC sixth scale Jeep on Thu Oct 25, 2018 2:53 pm


Very impressive build!


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12 Re: Building an RC sixth scale Jeep on Thu Oct 25, 2018 3:40 pm

Stryker2011

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Man, that is complex. More work than I’d be willing to do.


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13 Re: Building an RC sixth scale Jeep on Thu Oct 25, 2018 6:43 pm

I definitely like how this build is going! You have A LOT more patience than I do...

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14 Re: Building an RC sixth scale Jeep on Fri Oct 26, 2018 1:41 pm

peter the painter wrote:Looks way too technical for me Ed, but very entertaining to see.
Cheers,
Peter.

Thank you, Peter, but I disagree. You could figure it out pretty quickly. Shoot, you can sculpt an easily recognizable face on a lump of clay. Comparatively, this is child's play.


Ephiane wrote:You are the 1:6 Mac Gyver Very Happy

Many thanks, Eph. I try to make do with what's laying around, but specialty items are required. As I've written, been doing this for a long time, now.


BAD WOLF-787 wrote:
Very impressive build!

Thanks very much, Brother Wolf.


Stryker2011 wrote:Man, that is complex. More work than I’d be willing to do.

I appreciate it, Stryker. We all play to our strengths, I reckon.


Mr. Razz wrote:I definitely like how this build is going! You have A LOT more patience than I do...

Thank you a bunch, Mr. Razz. Glad you like it. I guess we have patience when we need to.



Installment IV


Now, the next thing to do was test fit the axles and the body. My buddy also put a temporary body mount in once everything was centered up.




We constructed a set of transfer case brackets out of some light gauge steel. They didn't seem stout enough, so I bent up another set out of some heavier aluminum stock.

Just a word about all this fabrication: It is true that most of this stuff can be purchased. There are some beautiful chassis and such available, but I chose to do all of that myself. It's not that I'm a glutton for punishment so much as one can spend a TON of money on the prebuilt stuff. Mine's not nearly as fine looking, but it is functional and should hold up well. Besides, the joy in this stuff is - for me, anyway - is coming up with a way to hurdle the obstacles.

So, I put the boys to work taking everything apart so the new chassis could get a coat of etching primer and black paint.












A Novak 45 turn motor provides the power for the rig. Here is a shot of that motor mounted to the Axial transmission. I chose a 45-turn to try and balance wheel speed and torque. More on that later, though.






A platform had to be constructed to hold the motor, tranny, speed controller and other various components.

Here's a shot of the platform with the motor/tranny combo mounted. It also shows the main drive shaft I had to construct to get power to the transfer case.

And, thanks to my kids, I'll never lack for a way to hold a chassis up while it's worked on.











Easy, there buddy. I swear, sometimes it's tough keeping the fellas in line... Can't say I really blame them, though.

Back to business. If you take a look at this underside shot of body, you'll notice a couple of things. First, there's a sizable tunnel molded in from the factory. I built the chassis so that the main shaft and the transfer case would fit up into that tunnel. The motor and tranny will remain under the hood, so there was no need to hack the body further for fitment there. Secondly, there's a pretty substancial recess where the fuel tank should be on the 1:1 (the driver's seat sits on top of it). I took advantage of that recess for tucking away the receiver and some excess wiring.





You might also notice there's a pretty sizable hole in the back of the Jeep where the rear bench seat used to be. That hack was put there to make room for the motor and rear axle in the original incarnation of the RC project. It had to be repaired. You can also see where some repairs were made under the front fenders.






Body pre-repairs:




And, post-repairs:




All the figures were pretty stoked to finish the project. Some got a little ahead of themselves.

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15 Re: Building an RC sixth scale Jeep on Sat Oct 27, 2018 8:06 am

Oh, yeah! You're one of those REAL R/C guys that knows what he's doing! I also detect a 1:1 off roader as well, I believe. Great build! Love the super realistic axles,transfer case and suspension!
A+++++

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Pontiacivan wrote:Oh, yeah! You're one of those REAL R/C guys that knows what he's doing! I also detect a 1:1 off roader as well, I believe. Great build! Love the super realistic axles,transfer case and suspension!
A+++++

Thank you, kind sir. You are correct on the 1:1 off-roading. I've done my share and still enjoy it, but don't have time much... It's great fun and sometimes a little scary.

In any case, it's given me a sense of what makes a real off-road vehicle work. I was able to proceed from there in 1:6, depending upon component availability.


Sorry it's been a while. I've been suffering from a severe case of damn-it's-been-busy.


Installment V


Everybody knows a good trail rig needs some protection.

Everybody should also be aware that I'm no wizard with a torch. I can weld, but I've got no rig, so putting together a bit of roll-over protection was going to present a challenge.

I had to learn to braze. I'd never done it before nor had I ever seen it done; however, I can read, so I got on-line and read several articles on the art of brazing.

I'm still not very good at it and the raw joints presented below are a shameful display. But, they cleaned up pretty well and I think they'll turn out OK.

I started by putting the basics together.





If you're going to attempt this, I heartily recommend getting a torch with an "auto striker" in the nozzle. Simply pull the trigger and you've got fire. This is a pretty good one.




After a bit of practice, I cobbled together this ugly contraption out of brake tubing and some smaller brass tubing I had lying around.








Then, I tried it with the body.




Well...there is some sort of shape being taken there, I reckon. Pretty good fit, too.




Sometimes, the boys and girls get a little ahead of themselves. At one point, they got to trying to move the chassis around a bit. Then they couldn't get it back up on the Lego jack stands.

I asked an old friend to go give them a hand.







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