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NEW PRODUCT: DAFTOYS 1/6 scale WWII Soldier figure

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Stryker2011

Stryker2011
Founding Father
Part list:
HEAR*2
BODY*1
HAND TYPE*6
SHIRT*1
PANTS*1
JACKET*1
SWEATER*1
BOOTS*1
SCARF*1
BELT*2
HAT*1
KNAPSACK*1
SOCKS*1
HOLSTER*1
KNIFE*2
GUN*4

male - NEW PRODUCT: DAFTOYS 1/6 scale WWII Soldier figure 1-528x29
male - NEW PRODUCT: DAFTOYS 1/6 scale WWII Soldier figure 5-528x30
male - NEW PRODUCT: DAFTOYS 1/6 scale WWII Soldier figure 7-528x28
male - NEW PRODUCT: DAFTOYS 1/6 scale WWII Soldier figure 8-528x28
male - NEW PRODUCT: DAFTOYS 1/6 scale WWII Soldier figure 9-528x25
male - NEW PRODUCT: DAFTOYS 1/6 scale WWII Soldier figure 16-52817
male - NEW PRODUCT: DAFTOYS 1/6 scale WWII Soldier figure 19-52816
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male - NEW PRODUCT: DAFTOYS 1/6 scale WWII Soldier figure 23-52815
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male - NEW PRODUCT: DAFTOYS 1/6 scale WWII Soldier figure 28-52814
male - NEW PRODUCT: DAFTOYS 1/6 scale WWII Soldier figure 34-52811

#newproduct #Daftoys #WWII #Soldier #male #movie-based

GubernatorFan

GubernatorFan
Founding Father
Looks like a pretty good set.


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brassco

brassco
Brad Pitt from the movie Inglourious Basterds, i think.

male - NEW PRODUCT: DAFTOYS 1/6 scale WWII Soldier figure Rs_600x600-190820151248-600-brad-pitt-inglorious-basterds-me-82019

male - NEW PRODUCT: DAFTOYS 1/6 scale WWII Soldier figure Jason-yang-hex-detail

skywalkersaga

skywalkersaga
Yeah, the outfit and accessories are neat, but the likeness isn't so great on this one...


_________________
"The happy ending of the fairy tale, the myth, and the divine comedy of the soul, is to be read,
not as a contradiction, but as a transcendence of the universal tragedy of man."

Focusing on the Prequels, Clone Wars, and Original Trilogy eras (NO 'sequels', thanks!)
https://the-far-bright-center.tumblr.com/

GubernatorFan

GubernatorFan
Founding Father
I think it's instantly recognizable, and certainly cool enough ... although I actually don't like this movie (perhaps it was over-hyped).


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skywalkersaga

skywalkersaga
GubernatorFan wrote:I think it's instantly recognizable, and certainly cool enough ... although I actually don't like this movie (perhaps it was over-hyped).

It is recognizable as being from that film, but I just thought as a Brad Pitt sculpt, it's perhaps not the greatest. ;p

And re: the movie itself -- when it comes to 'revenge porn' fantasy alternate history flicks by Tarantino, I vastly preferred Django Unchained. My favourite part of Inglourious Basterds was probably the scene of the burning movie theatre, mainly because 'Cat People' by David Bowie plays as the soundtrack. Very Happy


_________________
"The happy ending of the fairy tale, the myth, and the divine comedy of the soul, is to be read,
not as a contradiction, but as a transcendence of the universal tragedy of man."

Focusing on the Prequels, Clone Wars, and Original Trilogy eras (NO 'sequels', thanks!)
https://the-far-bright-center.tumblr.com/

Stryker2011

Stryker2011
Founding Father
GubernatorFan wrote:I think it's instantly recognizable, and certainly cool enough ... although I actually don't like this movie (perhaps it was over-hyped).

All of Tarantino’s movies are over-hyped, mostly boring AF, and in dire need of an editor. I remember reading, and hearing in person, from script writers, that the key to good writing was eliminate unnecessary scenes and dialogue that don’t have anything to do with the plot, or moving the plot forward — that’s everything Tarantino DOESN’T do in his scripts — boring, lengthy dialogue scenes that drone on and on about nothing. Gaghh! I generally end up falling asleep at his movies now. I liked his earlier stuff like Reservoir Dogs and, to a lesser extent, Pulp Fiction, but like a lot of writer/directors who get far too much praise, his ego has gotten the better of him, and he’s made all of his stuff too damn long, and filled them with even more unnecessary dialogue. Despite the length of The Lord of the Rings movies (especially the Extended Cuts), Peter Jackson wisely made the decision to remove any and all sequences that didn’t have anything to do with getting that ring to Mordor. Cut out all the crap that doesn’t have anything to do with the plot, and the Hateful Eight would have been a 90 minute movie — not nearly 4 hours. Think of the bar/card game scene in the movie that this figure is based on — I can’t remember a single line of dialogue that any of the Germans were saying because it just went on and on and on — just get to the damn point, Quinten! I’ll give him credit for being able to write “natural” dialogue, but it just doesn’t make for a good movie. If I want “natural” dialogue, I’ll talk to someone in real life. I go to movies to be entertained, not bored to death. There. That’s my Tarentino-style, boring as f#&k diatribe about his movies. Laughing


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male - NEW PRODUCT: DAFTOYS 1/6 scale WWII Soldier figure Bnp4ba10
Credit to greygoose for the signature card

brassco

brassco
well, I found personally the Hateful 8 Tarantino's version quite good. The most memorable would be Kill Bill. The latest Once upon a time in Hollywood is nothing too memorable. My favourite part with The Inglourious Basterds would be the last part of the movie where they were negotiating.

cheers.

blackpool

blackpool
Well... I do love Tarantino, especially Pulp Fiction that is a true masterpiece of acting and filming, I gotta agree his style is quite unique and therefore dividing the audience, but boring...?

For the records I did find Jackson's trilogy of the ring super badly cut and quite boring for all the scenes about frodo and sam's journey, especially on the first movie (bad acting, poor filming, golum saves the day from time to time but geeeeez it hurts to stand them)
As my girlfriend is a big fan I did watch the extended director's cuts of the three movies, and damnit they cut tons of very interesting scenes in the theater version, it's not about longer battles, that's dozens of sequences erased from the movie, with some very interesting details or talks (and to my eyes they greatly distract from the Frodo/Sam duo that is of such poor interest, mainly from the acting of Elijah Wood)

I recently noticed the same with Gladiator, the director's edition is so different, with so many scenes that were just cut in the name of the mainstream "formating" (I find that so lame, just as much as formating a song's length because of radio commercials and advertisements, that actually killed the musical aspect of most releases, no more breaks, no more solos...)

GeeWillikers

GeeWillikers
It's an unusual sculpt - instantly recognisable, but still something about the proportions is off, making it look just a little too cartoonish.  

I'm more or less with you on Tarantino, Stryker. While Reservoir Dogs, Pulp Fiction, Jackie Brown and Kill Bill are all good to great, only maybe PF is a bona fide classic movie. But after that... I didn't mind Inglorious Basterds too much, but at best it is merely an interesting but sprawling mess.

And boring? Yeah, I remember the ten long years I spent one evening watching Zoe Bell and pals talking endlessly and unrealistically about... uh, whatever it was round that table in the second act of Death Proof, after the five long months I'd spent in the first act of Death Proof listening to Sidney Poitier's daughter displaying a highly unlikely encyclopaedic knowledge of The Who (her character being a DJ notwithstanding).

I haven't willingly watched a QT movie since.

skywalkersaga

skywalkersaga
Re: Tarantino --- I think his films are some of those that are a matter of personal taste for a lot of people. I don't find them boring at all, but rather find that whether I come out of his movies 'liking' them or not depends greatly on the subject matter of each. Pulp Fiction is considered a classic and loved by many, and yet oddly it's one of my least favourites of his [that I've seen at least, I haven't seen all of them], not because I think it's objectively bad or boring [it's not!], but just because the subject matter and/or characters didn't appeal to me. Whereas the Kill Bill movies were some of my faves back in the day when they first came out, and I absolutely adored Django Unchained, and both of those are largely because of the subject matter or characters of each was just more my thing.

Don't know if it counts as a Tarantino movie since he wrote it rather than directed it, but From Dusk Till Dawn is another that I enjoyed, mainly for the ridiculous and over the top ending and the whole 'survivor girl' theme.

There are quite a few of his I haven't seen though, including the Hateful Eight, so can't comment on that one. ;p

ETA: With Tarantino's works, I find it helps to view them almost less as movies, and more as meta-commentary on movies, film genres, and film-making in general. :'D

Re: LotR films --- I am a huge Tolkien fan, and admittedly much more of a fan of Tolkien's written works than the movies, so I tend to have some rather strong opinions on certain aspects of the PJ films. The art direction and designs are beautiful, thanks to the fact that they used renowned Tolkien artists John Howe and Alan Lee to do the concept art. And I enjoyed Sir Ian as Gandalf, Sir Chris as Saruman, and of course, Viggo as Aragorn. I love you The actual films themselves, however, I have mixed feelings about. While I don't have a problem with the length the movies in theory, I do think Peter Jackson didn't always know how to pace those movies very well. Before tackling LotR, he was always primarily a horror director, and imo he had a tendency to inject a lot of unnecessary 'tension' into scenes that did not need it. Scenes that in the books were a much-needed 'respite' for the characters, and which consisted usually of interesting character moments or world-building were even at times made into tense and antagonistic scenes for no real reason.... I'm thinking of how he felt he had to turn Aragorn into a reluctant hero just to add 'suspense', and also especially of what he did to Faramir's character and his interactions with Frodo in the movies, which was unforgiveable from my perspective as a huge fan of Faramir in the books. He also turned some of Sam and Frodo's scenes into antagonistic scenes, when they never were. Pretty much all of The Two Towers, and a portion of Return of the King consist of a lot of changes that I felt did not enhance the story at all. Which is a shame, because there are some awesome scenes in both of those movies. When it comes to LotR films, I really like the Fellowship of the Ring director's cut, but as more of a book fan, I struggle with the latter two films. Even if I can look at them and say there are some really good aspects, I have too many issues with certain of the choices made to be able to sit back and fully enjoy them, much to my frustration.  

The less said about the later Hobbit films, the better. Razz

Blackpool -- you mentioned the Gladiator director's cut. Another Ridley Scott film that suffered IMMENSELY from being cut down was Kingdom of Heaven. The theatrical cut is a terrible movie, whereas the director's cut is incredible! There are several key scenes, especially featuring Eva Green's character's storyline, that were cut that otherwise made the story make no sense. Adding them back elevated the film to a whole 'nother level.

Getting back to this figure though....other than the unfortunate headsculpt, it does seem a decent set. Though looking at it again, is it just me or does the body on this one look oddly 'squat'?


_________________
"The happy ending of the fairy tale, the myth, and the divine comedy of the soul, is to be read,
not as a contradiction, but as a transcendence of the universal tragedy of man."

Focusing on the Prequels, Clone Wars, and Original Trilogy eras (NO 'sequels', thanks!)
https://the-far-bright-center.tumblr.com/

blackpool

blackpool
skywalkersaga wrote:Re: Tarantino --- I think his films are some of those that are a matter of personal taste for a lot of people. I don't find them boring at all, but rather find that whether I come out of his movies 'liking' them or not depends greatly on the subject matter of each. Pulp Fiction is considered a classic and loved by many, and yet oddly it's one of my least favourites of his [that I've seen at least, I haven't seen all of them], not because I think it's objectively bad or boring [it's not!], but just because the subject matter and/or characters didn't appeal to me. Whereas the Kill Bill movies were some of my faves back in the day when they first came out, and I absolutely adored Django Unchained, and both of those are largely because of the subject matter or characters of each was just more my thing.

Don't know if it counts as a Tarantino movie since he wrote it rather than directed it, but From Dusk Till Dawn is another that I enjoyed, mainly for the ridiculous and over the top ending and the whole 'survivor girl' theme.

There are quite a few of his I haven't seen though, including the Hateful Eight, so can't comment on that one. ;p

ETA: With Tarantino's works, I find it helps to view them almost less as movies, and more as meta-commentary on movies, film genres, and film-making in general. :'D

Re: LotR films --- I am a huge Tolkien fan, and admittedly much more of a fan of Tolkien's written works than the movies, so I tend to have some rather strong opinions on certain aspects of the PJ films. The art direction and designs are beautiful, thanks to the fact that they used renowned Tolkien artists John Howe and Alan Lee to do the concept art. And I enjoyed Sir Ian as Gandalf, Sir Chris as Saruman, and of course, Viggo as Aragorn. I love you The actual films themselves, however, I have mixed feelings about. While I don't have a problem with the length the movies in theory, I do think Peter Jackson didn't always know how to pace those movies very well. Before tackling LotR, he was always primarily a horror director, and imo he had a tendency to inject a lot of unnecessary 'tension' into scenes that did not need it. Scenes that in the books were a much-needed 'respite' for the characters, and which consisted usually of interesting character moments or world-building were even at times made into tense and antagonistic scenes for no real reason.... I'm thinking of how he felt he had to turn Aragorn into a reluctant hero just to add 'suspense', and also especially of what he did to Faramir's character and his interactions with Frodo in the movies, which was unforgiveable from my perspective as a huge fan of Faramir in the books. He also turned some of Sam and Frodo's scenes into antagonistic scenes, when they never were. Pretty much all of The Two Towers, and a portion of Return of the King consist of a lot of changes that I felt did not enhance the story at all. Which is a shame, because there are some awesome scenes in both of those movies. When it comes to LotR films, I really like the Fellowship of the Ring director's cut, but as more of a book fan, I struggle with the latter two films. Even if I can look at them and say there are some really good aspects, I have too many issues with certain of the choices made to be able to sit back and fully enjoy them, much to my frustration.  

The less said about the later Hobbit films, the better. Razz

Blackpool -- you mentioned the Gladiator director's cut. Another Ridley Scott film that suffered IMMENSELY from being cut down was Kingdom of Heaven. The theatrical cut is a terrible movie, whereas the director's cut is incredible! There are several key scenes, especially featuring Eva Green's character's storyline, that were cut that otherwise made the story make no sense. Adding them back elevated the film to a whole 'nother level.

Getting back to this figure though....other than the unfortunate headsculpt, it does seem a decent set. Though looking at it again, is it just me or does the body on this one look oddly 'squat'?

As for Tarantino, I might be an oldtimer lol, but I really prefer his first wave of movies, Reservoir Dogs, Pulp Fiction, and the underestimated Jackie Brown, the references were subtle, the inspiration taken from rare pieces of popculture and exploitation movies, both on the imagery and soundtracks. Kill Bill was kinda the paramount and end of that era at the same time as he kinda revealed all his inspiration sources in that double movie (from kungfu movies to spaghetti westerns), which makes it more a tribute to his masters and heroes. I also love his more recent works but they are another style of storytelling, mainly based on the "mexican standoff" concept, some inextricable situation that finds an abrupt or violent ending after a long status quo (that's very recurring in his last movies)

Again I perfectly understand and respect that his work divide a lot the audience, whatever the subject his movies are all built with a fragile balance between obsolete but very revealing talks, and strong violence.

Hateful eight is a bit different in the genre as it's "in camera" movie taking place in one room, like a dramatic play (this kind of movie is sooo risky, can be a hit or total miss)

About Tolkien's original material I'd have to read them again first, I did when I was 13/14, and again a few years later but never again. Your comment is very interesting to me anyway as it could be the reson why I hate the Frodo/Sam sequences, the antagonism between them might sound fake...

I will try to find the director's cut of Kingdom of Heaven cause I was disappointed by this movie when I love Ridley Scott's work usually. You just gave me my tonight watch goal lol


Back to the figure, better late than never but I find it a cool copy of the hot toys release, that's nice to have put two headsculpts even if they're not crazy in terms of variation... I don't find the likeness too off, if you rewatch the movie Brad Pitt was very good at overplaying the manly soldier, pushing his jaw forward exagerately and pinching his eyes to have a clint eastwood look Laughing

skywalkersaga

skywalkersaga
I was admittedly a bit too young to see the earlier Tarantino stuff when it first came out, so only came to it later on. Perhaps my view of it therefore is coloured by the fact that I'd already seen his later stuff and was more used to that style by that point. :3

What you describe about the Hateful Eight actually makes me want to watch it more, lol.

The Sam and Frodo scenes from The Two Towers onward absolutely grated on my nerves as well, as I thought it could have been handled so much better. I recall those scenes being a mix of quite dark/scary and bittersweet in the books, but not in the rather hamfisted way PJ did it. The only 'tension' that occurs with Sam and Frodo is that Sam internally becomes increasingly worried about Frodo's physical and mental health and about Frodo falling under the influence of the Ring, but they don't have some big fight about it like in the movie, and Frodo would never send Sam away, nor would Sam ever willingly leave Frodo at any point in the story. They do get separated in the books, but it's only because Frodo gets captured and then Sam must rescue him from the Tower of Cirith Ungol, which is quite a moving scene that even references some of Tolkien's earlier heroic tales of the First Age.

Even a this fan wiki agrees with me, noting:


One of the most unaccountable changes in the story made by the screenplay is Frodo casting Sam away after Sam offers to carry the One Ring once they had reached the top of the Stairs of Cirith Ungol. This did not happen in the book. Frodo and Sam remained together and did not part until Frodo was taken into the Tower of Cirith Ungol.

Hope you do get to watch the Director's Cut version of Kingdom of Heaven, blackpool. The butchered theatrical version should never have been released like that, imo.

I will take your word for the Brad Pitt likeness -- I only saw that movie once, so my memory of it is probably a bit fuzzy. :3


_________________
"The happy ending of the fairy tale, the myth, and the divine comedy of the soul, is to be read,
not as a contradiction, but as a transcendence of the universal tragedy of man."

Focusing on the Prequels, Clone Wars, and Original Trilogy eras (NO 'sequels', thanks!)
https://the-far-bright-center.tumblr.com/

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