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An online community to discuss and share news about sixth-scale figures, with an emphasis on either custom or commercial articulated figures.


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Hobby versus 'real life'

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42Hobby versus 'real life' - Page 2 Empty Re: Hobby versus 'real life' on Sat Nov 17, 2018 4:25 pm

Rogerbee

Rogerbee
Founding Father
Not seen that, I'll look it up on YouTube.

CHEERS!

43Hobby versus 'real life' - Page 2 Empty Re: Hobby versus 'real life' on Sat Nov 17, 2018 10:03 pm

Stryker2011

Stryker2011
Founding Father
Pontiacivan wrote:I think we received a small boost from the latest Honda commercial with The Six Million Dollar
Man action figure reminding us how much we enjoyed getting him for Christmas. If we are old enough to remember that Toy AND buy a Honda, I don't think people should make fun of us.

I still have that original Steve Austin (and his space capsule/rebuild accessory).


_________________
Mark

He who dies with the most toys wins!

Hobby versus 'real life' - Page 2 Bnp4ba10
Credit to greygoose for the signature card

44Hobby versus 'real life' - Page 2 Empty Re: Hobby versus 'real life' on Mon Jan 07, 2019 12:35 am

ThePhotogsBlog

ThePhotogsBlog
I'm 57. I'm building a model railroad, and I'm starting a 1/6th scale collection, which I'm going to use primarily to shoot photos. (I'm was also trained to be a commercial photographer and have all the equipment though I don't earn my primary living that way.) I know guys my own age who still build plastic model kits. Collecting toy soldiers is also considered an adult thing, if they are the right kind of toy soldiers.

What do all these things; model trains, plastic models,toy soldiers and 1/6th scale figures have in common? They are all miniature versions of real life things and human beings seem to love recreating the world in miniature and bringing it into their homes. You wouldn't deride anyone who had a collection of Fabergé eggs and the miniatures that went inside them would you? Well, aside from the monetary value, what exactly is the difference?

Nothing, I say. If you enjoy collecting 1/6th figures, then go ahead and collect them. If I had been the guy you brought back to your apartment I would probably have been impressed and told you about my own miniature collections.

45Hobby versus 'real life' - Page 2 Empty Re: Hobby versus 'real life' on Mon Jan 07, 2019 7:17 am

PureEnergy


ThePhotogsBlog wrote:You wouldn't deride anyone who had a collection of Fabergé eggs and the miniatures that went inside them would you?  Well, aside from the monetary value, what exactly is the difference? 

Sometimes I think that collecting Faberge might ultimately be less costly...   Wink


Dear Delaney, I dare say that your friend seems rather immature - and / or perhaps somewhat insecure - whereas, you do not...  

Being judgmental is merely the sad defense mechanism of those who deeply fear rejection (I might even go out on a limb and speculate that your friend wears too much make-up, as well).  

Furthermore, any man that would write you off for your personal interests without consideration and honest understanding is not worth bringing home - at least, certainly not a second time.  


Be who you are…  Passionately…  

Love what you will love...  Passionately…  

Live as you want to live…  Indeed, passionately

46Hobby versus 'real life' - Page 2 Empty Re: Hobby versus 'real life' on Mon Jan 07, 2019 7:37 am

Peaches

Peaches
Delanie wrote:Hi guys,

I have been trying to sell my flat for over 18 months now and a few weeks ago I had one of my best friends come over to 'help' me declutter so i could get better photo's. I have to say she's a really good friend but speaks her mind.

During the course of the conversation about what should get boxed or packed away she made a comment about my 'figures'/'dolls' saying " you know if you bought a man back here and he saw these he'd wonder what he was getting into!" bear in mind I have only got about 5 figures on show in my living room, she went on to say "having dolls and making stories about them is something 'little' girls do not women of your age !"


What is the consensus ? How do you folks reconsile our hobby with real life, ? I know there are a few of us women on here but it must be even worse for you guys?


I would just be interested in your oppinions.


(btw I have thicker skin than to allow her to stop me collecting so not giving up anytime soon cost is a problem though)

LOL, I got over my embarrassment over loving dolls by the time I was 50 Laughing . At that point you just don't give a darn what anyone else thinks, LOL. Even better, my hubby has always been nice to me about my passion. In return, I try to be nice to him about his (D&D) so we are geeks together cheers It's good for a guy to see your passions, who wants to invest emotionally into a potential partner, then they find out about something that is important to you, and they scoff at it? Get rid of 'em from the start, I say!

Only uncreative people have trouble understanding our hobbies. My best friend loves horses and collects all kinds of model horses. She gets me. Actually, I've never had anyone other than my mother (who thinks it's a waste of money) not think it's cool Smile My sister says she is envious that I have hobbies, and that if she didn't have her work, she'd have nothing??!! Of course, she is a better person and citizen of the world study Smart too. So yah, don't worry, we only live once, I say bounce

47Hobby versus 'real life' - Page 2 Empty Re: Hobby versus 'real life' on Mon Jan 07, 2019 9:18 pm

ReverendSpooky

ReverendSpooky
ThePhotogsBlog wrote:I'm 57. I'm building a model railroad, and I'm starting a 1/6th scale collection, which I'm going to use primarily to shoot photos.  (I'm was also trained to be a commercial photographer and have all the equipment though I don't earn my primary living that way.)  I know guys my own age who still build plastic model kits.  Collecting toy soldiers is also considered an adult thing, if they are the right kind of toy soldiers.

ThePhotogsBlog, I hope you don't mind if I occasionally pick your brain with photography questions.  I am always trying to up my photography game, especially in regards to photographing the 1/6 world.  When I think of the diversity of skill I see on here alone, not to mention the toy world in general, it always awes me that anyone can't see how interesting and impressive this hobby is

PureEnergy wrote:Sometimes I think that collecting Faberge might ultimately be less costly...   Wink

You said it man.  

PureEnergy wrote:Furthermore, any man that would write you off for your personal interests without consideration and honest understanding is not worth bringing home - at least, certainly not a second time.  


Be who you are…  Passionately…  

Love what you will love...  Passionately…  

Live as you want to live…  Indeed, passionately

Couldn't agree more.

Peaches wrote:LOL, I got over my embarrassment over loving dolls by the time I was 50  Laughing .  At that point you just don't give a darn what anyone else thinks, LOL. Even better, my hubby has always been nice to me about my passion.  In return, I try to be nice to him about his (D&D) so we are geeks together  cheers   It's good for a guy to see your passions, who wants to invest emotionally into a potential partner, then they find out about something that is important to you, and they scoff at it?  Get rid of 'em from the start, I say!

Only uncreative people have trouble understanding our hobbies.  My best friend loves horses and collects all kinds of model horses.  She gets me.  Actually, I've never had anyone other than my mother (who thinks it's a waste of money) not think it's cool Smile  My sister says she is envious that I have hobbies, and that if she didn't have her work, she'd have nothing??!!  Of course, she is a better person and citizen of the world study Smart too.  So yah, don't worry, we only live once, I say bounce

I 2nd all this.  I never really get people who are in relationships that don't share some common interest, or at least understanding and respect, especially for an interest that's a big part of your life.  Having at least an interest or curiosity in your interests seems like a bare minimum litmus test for people in your life.

And I think we geeks have inherited the earth.  All the genre stuff that used to be niche has become the big summer blockbusters.  And considering the huge availability of 1/6 offerings, it's a hell of a good time to be into this hobby.

http://reverendspooky.com

48Hobby versus 'real life' - Page 2 Empty Re: Hobby versus 'real life' on Mon Jan 07, 2019 9:28 pm

ThePhotogsBlog

ThePhotogsBlog
Photographers, unlike magicians never mind sharing their tricks. We are always happy to help others hone their skills.

49Hobby versus 'real life' - Page 2 Empty Re: Hobby versus 'real life' on Tue Jan 08, 2019 7:07 am

PureEnergy


ReverendSpooky wrote: I never really get people who are in relationships that don't share some common interest, or at least understanding and respect, especially for an interest that's a big part of your life.  Having at least an interest or curiosity in your interests seems like a bare minimum litmus test for people in your life...
 
Indeed, Spooks, it sounds like you’re referring to the concept of compatibility…  

I suppose that some might argue that there is a difference between the romantic and the platonic, and that no such litmus test exists for either, necessarily.  In terms of behavior, I have to believe that if two are to get along, they must ultimately find and share some common ground; but that may be as specific as is required for any sort of positive relationship.  

I’d say the more important factor (and one which you’d also mentioned) is an open understanding of one another as individuals with our own distinctive qualities, interests and idiosyncrasies - that which makes us unique unto ourselves; sincere appreciation for one another as equals but perhaps quite different by way of specific characteristics is essential for any sort of mutuality or reciprocity of respect - be it friendship or romance...  

We don’t have to enjoy the same things; we only need to respect each other enough to understand that each of us will justly have our own, quite simply.

50Hobby versus 'real life' - Page 2 Empty Re: Hobby versus 'real life' on Wed Jan 09, 2019 4:28 pm

henchman21

henchman21
As has been said... my hobby is my hobby, both of my ex wives never criticized my hobby, as it was a means of decompression. Creativity is one of those things that is a form of self therapy . I play mil-sim airsoft as well, and I get stranger looks for that. I haven't bought anything new in over a decade, but I've pretty much gone towards kitbashing anyways. When I describe the work put into a figure, I get quite a few "wow, cool" responses.
So yeah, if they denigrate your hobby, they aren't going to be invited over for dinner.

51Hobby versus 'real life' - Page 2 Empty Re: Hobby versus 'real life' on Thu Jan 10, 2019 2:29 am

PureEnergy


henchman21 wrote: my hobby is...  ex wives...

Sorry, Hench.  That was simply irresistible...   Smile

“Therapy,” indeed - and the difference between hobby and art is entirely subjective - if not merely a measure of that degree by which we claim it to be of any import beyond but for ourselves.  

Personally, I believe that any amount of alteration or modification constitutes an artistic endeavor, and thus makes this something other than numismatics or apiculture...  

Anyone who can see only playthings empty of artistic merit is definitely a dullard.

52Hobby versus 'real life' - Page 2 Empty Re: Hobby versus 'real life' on Thu Jan 10, 2019 1:17 pm

peter the painter


Reminds me of a joke I once heard, " what's with train spotters? I counted ten of those sad bozos on the way to the hobby shop". Wink

"one mans meat" and all that.

Cheers,


Peter.

53Hobby versus 'real life' - Page 2 Empty Re: Hobby versus 'real life' on Thu Jan 10, 2019 1:48 pm

Pontiacivan

Pontiacivan
For years I have attempted to show relatives photos of the figures I have,and work on, with them showing little interest.
This year my wife and I hosted the family for Christmas and many of them got to see my figures in person for the first time, since my primary work area is in the living room.
Some were absorbed by the figures and poseabilty, other by the detail of the available accessories and some by the painting/weathering tools and crafting supplies.
I did not make any converts, but they all found at least one aspect that kept them returning to my corner to look around.
Since I am not a collector, my open invitation to "pick up and try" was both a surprise and ( for the kids) a shock.
I think my family has a new appreciation for the fact that I'm not just an adult playing "GI Joes" instead of some other "more manly " hobby.

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